20. Psychology student. Seville. Spain
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from currentsinbiology  537 notas

txchnologist:

Viral Membrane Protects Medical Nanorobots From Immune System

Scientists say they have developed a cloaking device to spirit medical nanorobots of the future past immune systems into diseased cells. Their innovation comes from stealing a powerful weapon viruses wield to infect their hosts.

Some viruses wrap themselves in a protective membrane to avoid detection by their host’s immune system and enter cells they are trying to infect. A team at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have been able to construct their own version of a viral membrane.

Read More

Reblogged from asylum-art  396 notas

asylum-art:

Swirls Portraits of Paint in Water - Chris Slabber

on Behance

South African artist Chris Slabber has created a spectacular new series called Destruction/Creation, which features images of gorgeous “sculptures” formed from paint swirling in water. He uses photo manipulation to form delicate figures in the billows of paint, creating stunning portraits. 

Reblogged from futurozombie  6 278 notas

halinacrown:

Hannibal Art Meme

Vincent Van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890)
By the time of his death in 1890, Van Gogh’s work had begun to attract critical attention. His paintings were featured at the Salon des Indépendants in Paris between 1888 and 1890 and with Les XX in Brussels in 1890. As Gauguin wrote to him, his recent works, on view at the Indépendants in Paris, were regarded by many artists as “the most remarkable” in the show; and one of his paintings sold from the 1890 exhibition in Brussels. In January 1890, the critic Albert Aurier published the first full-length article on Van Gogh, aligning his art with the nascent Symbolist movement and highlighting the originality and intensity of his artistic vision. By the outbreak of World War I, with the discovery of his genius by the Fauves and German Expressionists, Vincent van Gogh had already come to be regarded as a vanguard figure in the history of modern art. (x) (x) (x) (x)
Reblogged from asylum-art  260 notas

asylum-art:

Intricate and Mysterious photography by Christine Muraton

on deviantART

French photographer Christine Muraton has an extraordinary talent for capturing hauntingly stunning photographs that convey intriguing stories. Inspired by literature, classical studies, philosophy, and psychology, the photographer creates highly atmospheric portraits that are often visually and conceptually ambiguous. Figures are blurred, obscured, or have their backs turned to the viewer, concealing identities by never fully revealing their faces. Subjects blend into unreal landscapes, raising further questions of who they are and what they’re doing in such fantastic places.